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Atlantic Business Continuity Services

Hurricane Irma – What you should be doing now to prepare

September 5, 2017Scott CaveNews, Update


Hurricane Irma is now a one of the strongest hurricanes ever recorded in the Atlantic. A storm this powerful bears careful watch and planning now for its impacts. With the ongoing uncertainty of the path and impact area in the United States, it is important for organizations along the Alabama, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina coastlines to start implementing their hurricane plans immediately. Following are ten tips to consider in your preparations:

  1. Make hotel reservations now. Hotels are already booked with reservations for this weekend and next week, as residents and businesses from several states are planning for a potential evacuation. Know your destination, your route, and your accommodation reservations. Don’t wait any longer; make your reservations now and encourage your staff to do the same.
  2. Identify your evacuation zone and route. Evacuation orders could be issued several days before potential impacts from the hurricane. Use the following information to identify your evacuation zone and route. Once the evacuation order is given, you may no longer have a choice of your evacuation route, so evacuate early if you want to be sure that you can travel the route of your choice.
  1. Develop a Communications Plan. Talk to your staff about their plans now and make sure you know where they plan to go and how you can stay in touch with them. Develop a regular daily schedule for briefings or updates to your staff, customers, and other stakeholders. Identify conference call lines, email distribution lists, alternate methods of communication if needed.
  2. Identify critical items for evacuation. Make sure each staff member develops a short list of critical items that are essential to performing their job. Then develop a packing list so everyone knows what they are taking with them during an evacuation to perform their job remotely.
  3. Follow local emergency information. In South Carolina, our state and county emergency management use Operating Conditions, or OPCONs, to identify the current status of their emergency operations. OPCON 5 is normal (good), and OPCON 1 is full operations (bad). For a hurricane in South Carolina, OPCON 1 generally means that an evacuation order has been issued by our Governor. You can follow OPCON and other emergency announcements on Twitter from these agencies (also sign up for emergency alerts at website listed in parentheses where available):
  4. Confirm re-entry process. Once an evacuation order is issued, a separate process known as re-entry is implemented in phases to return residents, workers, etc. back into the evacuated area. This process varies by jurisdiction, so check with your local government on their exact process for credentials and procedures. Following are some local links:
  5. Ensure technology availability. Make sure your IT systems, including computers, software, data, communications, internet, etc. are all prepared for an extended evacuation. Verify that your staff knows how to access these systems and use them productively while remote for an extended time. Work with your IT partners and vendors to make sure these systems are resilient and ready with a back-up plan if needed.
  6. Confirm insurance claim process. Make sure you know the process to follow if an insurance claim is required. Get all the proper documentation in order now so it is ready when needed, including policy information, contact numbers, video and photographic documentation, asset lists and values, financial information, etc.
  7. Prepare your home and family. Don’t forget that all disasters are personal, and you need to personally prepare yourself, your home, and your family. This includes boarding up windows and protecting garage doors, gathering important insurance documents, taking video of your home and contents, filling prescriptions, making hotel reservations for family members and pets, getting emergency supplies ready, etc.
  8. Prepare for the worst. This isn’t hype or fear mongering, but emergency and disaster plans need to be based on the worst case scenario so that you aren’t caught by surprise when things head south quickly. So prepare for the worst in this storm, including a direct landfall near your location, extended and prolonged evacuation, utility disruptions, personal impacts to your home and family, etc.

 

Overwhelmed, stressed, or confused? We’re here to help. Contact us for assistance before or after the storm. We will all get through this together.

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